No Quick Fixes

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It’s in our human natures to want simple answers, and yet it is rare that we are able to alleviate complex problems with quick fixes. At best we might patch things together until the time at which we consider all facets of an issue and attempt to arrive at a solution that more closely resembles what we require. Even then there will ultimately be imperfections, instances in which our ideas don’t work as well as we might have intended.

Years inside a classroom taught me that I had to be flexible and ready to change course at a moments notice. Something that worked magnificently with one group of students might backfire with another. It is virtually impossible to have a one size fits all solution for the problems that daunt human beings. Nonetheless we often attempt to quickly cobble together ideas to deal with the challenges that we face. It is in our natures to want to be done with things that irritate us and then move on.

We long for an easy diet to help us lose weight. We desire healthcare that costs little or nothing and also provides world class medicine. We dream of finding the magic bullet of education that will turn all of our youngsters into little Einsteins. We hope to eradicate our debts without pain. We think that it would be great to simply dig into the pockets of the wealthy to fund programs that seemingly would allow everyone to live well. We want peace on earth with no real effort. We long to stop the chaos of the world without pain or sacrifice. We hope to find the magic person or pill that will make our lives almost perfect without all of the hard work that our day to day experiences now require.

Thus we have politicians on the right and on the left who are hawking plans that may seem so wonderful until we actually take the time to analyze them and to consider the many downsides of them. Knowing that we may balk when we use our critical thinking skills they play to our fears, our jealousies, and our prejudices. They cause us to worry and then unveil their solutions with the flourish of banging drums, little different from the traveling salesmen who entice us with promises of stress free lives if only we buy into their “flim-flamming.”

There is no free lunch. Everything that we attempt has a price in effort or emotion or money. We must decide which sacrifices we are willing to make for the common good even as we understand that we may not be perfectly happy with the results. We may have to revise and edit our decisions once we see the flaws. It is a rare thing to get exactly what we need on the first try. We must proceed with caution while understanding that there will be bumps in the road.

We are not that unlike our ancestors in attempting to settle our differences and lessen our fears. Most of us have little or no desire for power, but we do require a sense of freedom, safety, security for ourselves and those that we love. We invest time, money and energy into to providing those things for ourselves. We send our children to school each day. We travel to jobs to earn the funds to use for food, housing and our most basic needs. We agree to follow certain rules to alleviate anarchy in our midst. Mostly though we just want to be left alone to be ourselves, so we elect leaders who appear to reflect our views and then hope for the best as they represent us.

Of late there has been a style of governing that makes many of us uneasy. It is built not so much on certain common desires, but more on radical thinking that makes us uncomfortable and tears us apart. Many of our politicians appeal to our basest fears and divisions. They are more rabble rousers than diplomats. They are steadfast in creating chaos rather than compromises. They suggest simplistic ideas without research or data or logic. Thus we become agitated and then turn on one another only reinforcing their vacuous power. Each side wants us to believe that they are good and their opponents are bad. When we fall for their tactics we too become engaged in never ending battles with our own friends or we simply turn our backs on the whole tragedy and hope that by ignoring the rancor we will ultimately be okay.

If we are honest we will admit to the problems that concern us and also agree that neither side of the discussions has it completely right. We have work to do, but we will never move forward in the direction that we need if we settle for simplistic ideas. A wall will not solve our immigration problems any more than the Affordable Care Act has made healthcare more available to everyone. Our schools will not become better by throwing more money at them nor will the cost of higher education be mitigated if we make it free. Our planet needs our help and denying that fact will not halt the destruction that we have wrought on it nor will grandiose plans to eliminate fossil fuels without searching for other ways to power our industries and our homes. Respecting the freedoms and the diversity of mankind requires talents that far too many of our lawmakers lack. As long as we keep sending individuals to our nation’s capitol who are unwilling to budge and work together we will be wasting our time and our national treasure. If we can’t even get along within our own communities, we can hardly expect good outcomes in Washington D.C.

There are answers to each of the concerns that we may have but they will require a level of calm and rationality that is in short supply these days. We the people have to admit that we will often have to compromise, give a little to get a little. This is the message that our leaders need to hear. This is the reality that we must all understand.

  

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